Author Topic: Favorite Book  (Read 34772 times)

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Offline Dead_Ghost

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« Reply #60 on: November 24, 2005, 12:32:11 AM »
Quote from: "Nashana"
Quote
Actually, I'm not fond of Harry Potter. Not really my style.  
If I want Magic and alike, I'll stick with Howard Philip Lovecraft.

Never heard of him, but as long as he doesn't write :puke:  yuck mushiii romance I think I would probably like him.

Never heard of The Chtulhu Mythos? :D
Try reading The Call of Chtulhu, The Shadows Over Innsmouth, At the Mountains of Madness, The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath, just to name a few. He wrote many short stories.
http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/l/h-p-lovecraft/index.html
This link can tell you more about the writer and his work. :)
*nothing to see here. move along, move along*

Offline Nashana

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« Reply #61 on: November 24, 2005, 04:01:05 AM »
Quote
Never heard of The Chtulhu Mythos?  
Try reading The Call of Chtulhu, The Shadows Over Innsmouth, At the Mountains of Madness, The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath, just to name a few. He wrote many short stories.


Hmmmmmm a horror writer not bad the first book I read by my one free will was a horror novel. :)
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Offline charla

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« Reply #62 on: November 24, 2005, 05:32:18 AM »
Quote from: "Nashana"
Quote
Never heard of The Chtulhu Mythos?  
Try reading The Call of Chtulhu, The Shadows Over Innsmouth, At the Mountains of Madness, The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath, just to name a few. He wrote many short stories.


Hmmmmmm a horror writer not bad the first book I read by my one free will was a horror novel. :)


He was also mentally ill. Deathly afraid of deep water from memory. Wrote an interesting tale about cats, from memory. Was very popular as a RPG at Uni, although the campaigns tended to be very short as characters either went mad or failed to stop the beastie from destroying the world/cosmos.

Originally, D&D had the deities from that series but they had to remove them when the rpg came out. Ah well. It was amusing working out plans to kill Cthulhu. I was involved in a hit squad of mutant chickens in powered armour. Ah, the good old days.

Offline Mistress Elysia

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« Reply #63 on: November 24, 2005, 09:12:29 AM »
Oooh, HP Lovecraft. How could I forget him? I am a massive fan of his works (+ Clark Ashton Smith and a bit of Arthur Machen too).

HP Lovecraft wasn't mentally ill in the traditional sense - he was a depressive. Even he admits all of his stuff was 'rubbish'. I read a very interesting article in Fortean Times about him, and he found it infinitely amusing that people thought the Necronomicon was real. However, the deep water thing is true... he hated the sea and was terrified of it's depths. However, as much as I love him, I also have to take the mick... heh heh, my RPing buddies know all about my tentacle 'thing', and  one year they went as far as to buy me a cuddly Cthulhu and some dried cuttlefish for my birthday! (Note to self - never confess that one of your greatest ambitions in life is to own a tank full of cuttlefish...)

Offline charla

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« Reply #64 on: November 24, 2005, 09:33:57 AM »
I had a look and opinions as to whether he was mentally ill varied... cetainly his mother seemed to be. Here's one quote from http://www.hplovecraft.com/life/biograph.htm :

"    As a boy Lovecraft was somewhat lonely and suffered from frequent illnesses, many of them apparently psychological. ...

In 1904 the death of Lovecraft’s grandfather, and the subsequent mismanagement of his property and affairs, plunged Lovecraft’s family into severe financial difficulties. Lovecraft and his mother were forced to move out of their lavish Victorian home into cramped quarters at 598 Angell Street. Lovecraft was devastated by the loss of his birthplace, and apparently contemplated suicide, as he took long bicycle rides and looked wistfully at the watery depths of the Barrington River. But the thrill of learning banished those thoughts. In 1908, however, just prior to his graduation from high school, he suffered a nervous breakdown that compelled him to leave school without a diploma; this fact, and his consequent failure to enter Brown University, were sources of great shame to Lovecraft in later years, in spite of the fact that he was one of the most formidable autodidacts of his time.

From 1908 to 1913 Lovecraft was a virtual hermit, doing little save pursuing his astronomical interests and his poetry writing. During this whole period Lovecraft was thrown into an unhealthily close relationship with his mother, who was still suffering from the trauma of her husband’s illness and death, and who developed a pathological love-hate relationship with her son."


This site has a lovely picture of the gentleman in question (and his headstone) : http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=1188&pt=H.P.%20Lovecraft

Offline Simon Darkshade

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« Reply #65 on: November 25, 2005, 06:19:32 AM »
In the depths of night, I have given further thought to my literary tastes and literary history, and will attempt a rough journey through the steep and winding passes of the past. Let me take you back to the mid 1980s...

My entry point into fantasy literature was a mixture of the modern classics - The Chronicles of Narnia, The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, The Chronicles of Prydain, The Simarillion; tomes of mixed origin such as Roald Dahl, Henry Treece, Rosemary Sutcliffe, John Christopher, Alan Garner, Earth Invaded/Hood's Army; and the great classics - Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress.

The further element which tipped the balance was that great component of 1980s popular culture, the gamebook. Fighting Fantasy, Tunnels and Trolls, Lone Wolf and all manner of lesser lights proved to be the final factor which one me over. They were accompanied by Conan comics, the red D&D Basic set and shortly after that AD&D 1st and 2nd editions, a plethora of other roleplaying and board games

The initial tastes lead to deeper exploration along several lines.

I got into the roots of the genre in mythology and medieval legends, and with great authors such as Lord Dunsany, Michael Moorcock, Fritz Leiber, Ursula LeGuin, Anne McCaffrey, Piers Anthony (particularly his Battle Circle work and the Bio of a Space Tyrant), Robert Adams of Horseclans fame, Robert E. Howard and L. Sprague De Camp (I have a vivid memory of being enrapt by the rollicking story of the Goblin Tower one hot summer day in 1991.)

I exploited this by getting my hands on anything related, including Tamora Pierce's engaging works, and the comic masterpieces of Douglas Adams, Terry Pratchet, Tom Holt and others.

I entered the Realms through Darkwalker on Moonshae, and then turned towards Shadowdale for the Avatars and Crusade. I developed a large collection of boxed sets and supplements, and ordered an obscure magazine named Dragon (which contained some most excellent short fiction in the period 1991-1996).

A most advantageous move came when I swapped a brace of Forgotten Realms novels for a whole pile of Dragonlance books, which then rapidly increased in number. Weis and Hickmann created an engaging world with complicated and absorbing characters that strummed a certain note in my 11 and 12 year old mind. My travels have often bought me back to Krynn.

At the age of 8, I noticed a new book in my local library with an intriguing cover. I borrowed it, read it, and got a general gist for it. I returned to it the next year, and was hooked again. The Eye of the World.
I have been a helpless hamster on Jordan's Wheel of Time ever since, though recently I was thrown some bread and circuses with a knife to my dreams.

High fantasy and sword and sorcery alike were my domain, and sometimes discoveries just fell into my lap - I purchased The Sword of Shannara whilst on a Vancouver ferry in 1992, and then proceeded to snap up the following two volumes after getting a taste. The remainder of that holiday was punctuated by late nights reading of the battle tactics of Stee Jans whilst watching snow through the basement bedroom window.

There remained a few more important episodes - the discovery of David Gemmell in 1997/8, with his sparse tight prose conveying gritty reality lit by the hero light of noble intent in a flawed world. His tomes and characters have been my friends through many journeys.

In late 2001, I noticed a great deal of fuss about the upcoming Harry Potter films, and obtained the first book out of curiosity. I soon obtained the following volumes, and their mixture of rollicking Blytonesque school fun with developing fantasy is quite interesting.

Now, through the vagaries of fortune, I find myself as the facilitator of younger reading, of planting the spark of an interest in the genre with the loan of a particular tome to some eager youngster not unlike myself all those years ago. It is an interesting situation.

I love reading of all sorts of books, and love words and language. The physical tomes themselves oft have appeal, with their individual texture, smell, and the memory of the pages. Some of my old texts have fallen apart due to heavy reading. They are old friends good and true.

I still visit the library which was a big catalyst for my journey into this particular aspect of the book multiverse. I would like to say that its halls are replete with memory, and that I can see bits and pieces of my life, and the lives of past friends when visiting and remembering. But it is not to be. Rationalization has lead to virtually all of the old stock being pulped or flogged off for a few pieces of silver. But hey, they have some new editions of the Penguin classics, coffee and Dan Brown, so what more can a reasonable individual expect of them.

These were and are the fantasy books of my life. Many of the volumes have gone, and others slipped into the recesses of memory. Yet their story lives on, and is passed on. And that, to me, is eternal.
They'll say 'Here lies Druss the Legend, who was never mean, petty, nor needlessly cruel. Here was a man who never gave in, never compromised his ideals, never betrayed a friend, never despoiled a woman and never used his strength against the weak.' They'll say 'He had no sons, but many a woman asleep with her babes slept more soundly for knowing Druss stood with the Drenai.' They'll say many things, whitebeard. Through many generations they will say them, and men with no strength will find strength when they hear them."

"That would be pleasant," said the old man, smiling.

Offline MyFinalHeaven

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« Reply #66 on: November 25, 2005, 10:34:44 PM »
My favourite book has not been in doubt for years and I doubt it ever will be again. Les Miserables. What an amazing piece of literature.
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Offline SuperNovice

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« Reply #67 on: March 24, 2006, 07:55:32 PM »
Despite the fact that fantasy is my favorite genre, most of my favorite books are not fantasy.

If I had to pick a favorite though, I think I'd pick Starship Troopersby Heinlein. I'm talking about the book mind you, not that terrible piece of trash movie 'based' on it.

Offline Angel_Of_Hope

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« Reply #68 on: May 08, 2006, 01:49:52 AM »
My all time greatest book i've ever read have to be all the R.A Salvatore Book based in the Forgotten Realms, The Silmmirillion(lol sorry if i cant spell it right), The Lotr series, All of Terry Pratchett, The Narnia chronicles and right now im busy reading Thomas Covenant, The Unbeliever if any ones heard of it?
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Offline kuemper

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« Reply #69 on: May 08, 2006, 06:01:02 AM »
The Runaway Bunny - the first book I ever read and I still have it; grape jelly stains and all. :wub:
When a man speaks and there is no woman to hear him, is he still wrong?

For the faithful romantic, no explanation is necessary. For the unbeliever, no explanation is possible.

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Offline Jarlaxle

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« Reply #70 on: June 25, 2006, 05:24:44 PM »
My interests vary widely, from Dale Brown's techno-thrillers, to Kay Hooper's intriguing Noah Bishop books, to Clive Cussler's thrilers, to Realms & DL fantasy, to Star Trek.  I will say that my introduction to the Realms came when a friend let me borrow his copy of Salvatore's Homeland.  I now have the complete set: Dark Elf (signed), Icewind Dale (signed), Paths of Darkness (signed, hardback), Hunters' Blades, Sellswords (hardback), Cleric Quintet, War of the Spider Queen.  As my username illustrates, I like Salvatore's writing. :) I also greatly enjoyed Elaine Cunningham's Harper (Songs & Swords) books, and her Windwalker series.

However, were I to name one author, it would probably be Salvatore.
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Offline Xira

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« Reply #71 on: June 28, 2006, 03:04:20 PM »
Island of the Blue Dolphins
"Love" that is a very rare thing. When you find it you better safeguard it. ---Shirley Manson

Offline nethrin

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« Reply #72 on: June 28, 2006, 05:22:22 PM »
Moby-Dick

Ahab, on Moby Dick
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He tasks me; he heaps me; I see in him outrageous strength, with an inscrutable malice sinewing it. That inscrutable thing is chiefly what I hate; and be the white whale agent, or be the white whale principal, I will wreak that hate upon him. Talk not to me of blasphemy, man; I'd strike the sun if it insulted me.
               

Offline tempest4

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« Reply #73 on: June 29, 2006, 06:43:36 AM »
I greatly enjoy fantasy, but not many of my top twenty or so are fantasy.

1. Ender's Game, by Orson Scott Card
2. Red Storm Rising, by Tom Clancy
3. Midshipman's Hope, by David Feintuch
4. The Magic Engineer, by L.E. Modesitt Jr.
5. The Door Into Summer, by Robert Heinlein
"Insanity: A perfectly sane response to an insane universe."

Offline Jarlaxle

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« Reply #74 on: July 01, 2006, 06:54:52 PM »
If you like Heinlein, I suggest Freehold, by Michael Z. Williamson.
Jarlnian Del'Axle, third son of Yvonnel Baenre; leader of Bregan D'Aerthe